Wednesday, March 29, 2006

I Don’t Get It

Kadima won the Israeli election. Apparently, Labor will be making up a large portion of the government as well, so much that some say Peretz could become prime minister. I realize there was low voter turnout but to my mind, this spells disaster. How can Israelis think Kadima and Labor are a recipe for success? Or am I completely wrong to be worried?

13 Comments:

At 1:07 PM, Blogger Iran Watch said...

Well I don't understand the low voter turnout. Seems that this should be one of the most important elections now that Hamas is controlling the Palestinians. I'm not well-versed one Israeli political parties. What type of line does the Labor Party take toward Israeli Defense? I'm guessing by your disappointment, that they aren't aggressive enough. Am I wrong?

 
At 1:16 PM, Blogger drummaster2001 said...

esther- i'm with you. i haven't liked what has been going on since last early summer. people who voted for these parties probably won't see the dangers until it is too late.

 
At 1:45 PM, Blogger Esther said...

IW, since no party is delivering anything anyone can like or believe, I'm sure it seemed futile to even bother. Think of it here in the states when two people are running and you dislike both. Doesn't motivate you to actually go vote. Labor is the leftist party.

DM, who could blame them? They voted for Likud and suddenly, Sharon turned the party into leftists. That had to have felt like a huge betrayal.

 
At 3:26 PM, Blogger Rory said...

Esther,
One thing I can tell you is that the State of Israel never resembles a Levantine bazaar (or should we make that bizarre?)as much as when they hold elections. As Batya pointed out in one of your previous posts, they nominate a party rather than a candidate, but, in addition, there's a process involving the forming of a coalition and that's when the real horse-trading starts up in earnest. As you said, Labor is the leftist party (and there are others further to the left of Labor like Meretz and the Communist party) yet, that being the case, one of the parties that Labor will attempt to entice into joining a coalition is Shas. For those who may not be familiar with it, Shas is one of the more influential religious parties made up primarily of Israelis from the Middle East and North Africa. As such, they tend to be somewhat more flexible than the religious parties whose members are European Jews. For instance, they're more willing to accept certain territorial compromise with the Palestinians. However, they still don't have much in common, ideologically, with the Labor Party, but all sorts of deals will be made and two parties that have very different agendas can end up as partners in a coalition. Think of the Push Me/Pull You in "Dr. Doolittle."

 
At 4:39 PM, Blogger drummaster2001 said...

it couldn't have been too much of a betrayal- they voted for kadima.

 
At 6:03 PM, Blogger Always On Watch said...

I confess my ignorance as to Israeli politics. But low turnout is a matter of serious concern, IMO. I thought that Israelis went to the polls in large numbers. Maybe I am wrong.

 
At 12:01 AM, Blogger Mr. Beamish the Instablepundit said...

Apparently seeing images on international television of the IDF forcing Jewish people out of their homes juxtaposed next to images of Hamas celebrating in the streets that their campaign of suicide bombing had delivered the Gaza Strip to them isn't enough to dissuade anyone from voting for more of the same.

 
At 12:16 AM, Blogger MissingLink said...

I agree with Mr Beamish.
People just don't see much of a solution into the problem anymore.
We have two young Israelis visiting our blog now and then and they feel, very much depressed.

 
At 6:25 AM, Blogger Brooke said...

Could the loss of Sharon have put the Israeli people into some kind of funk?

I can't imagine a low turnout with the threat of literally your next-door neighbor wanting to kill you.

I understand fatigue, but not apathy.

 
At 7:09 AM, Blogger Iran Watch said...

Still, with the election of Hamas, Israel is faced with a Palestinian government that has vowed to destroy Israel. I suppose that Israel might be used to these types of threats but I think Hamas is much more dangerous than the previous Arafat governments.

 
At 10:00 AM, Blogger Rory said...

I'm beginning to think that Israelis are suffering from battle fatigue. They usually vote in large numbers, so the low turnout in this election is unusual. But, there's a lot of corruption in the political system, and while that's true in many other countries, they're not necessarily under the existential threat that Israel is.

Iran Watch,
While I don't disagree with you, we can't overlook the fact that Arafat never renounced the PLO's intention to destroy Israel. His phony pronouncements in English, to western audiences, belied what he was saying in Arabic to his followers. And if there's anything positive in the Hamas victory, it's that now the real agenda of the Palestinians has been revealed for all the world to see. Unfortunately, people seemed to forget that Arafat was one of the worst Arab terrorists who ever lived, and Mahmoud Abbas, the Holocaust denier and architect of the Munich massacre, was one of his most loyal henchmen. At least, with Hamas, everyone knows where they stand.

 
At 12:51 PM, Blogger Batya said...

Sharon and Peres put many Israelis into a "funk." Sharon was elected on a right wing, pro-settlement platform and reversed sides, then took his crooks from Likud and other parties, made a new one. must I go on?

Pere's "new middle east" meant that there was to be no patriotism, no values etc.

If that's the case...

 
At 1:54 PM, Blogger Gindy said...

"Sharon and Peres put many Israelis into a "funk." "

Peres definitely. Sharon did to one degree or another. I was even losing some faith.

 

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